Carlos Moya makes his picks for the "perfect player"

Former world number one Carlos Moya explained which top players' weapons would combine to make the perfect tennis player.

Carlos Moya makes his picks for the "perfect player"
Carlos Moya (right) and Rafael Nadal meet at the net after a match back in Moya's playing days. Photo: Reuters

There is no such thing as a perfect player. At least, no one player is perfect. Every player has weapons that they use to great effect, but no one player hits every shot and plays every part of the game better than everyone else.

Combined together, some individual weapons of specific players could add up to make the perfect player. In that case, whose weapons do you choose? Carlos Moya has ventured to create the perfect tennis player based on today's stars. Here is what the former world number one and French Open champion says is the perfect tennis player.

Forehand: Roger Federer

Federer hits a forehand during the semifinals of Wimbledon. Photo: Shaun Botterill/Getty Images
Federer hits a forehand during the semifinals of Wimbledon. Photo: Shaun Botterill/Getty Images

This comes as no surprise. Roger Federer has long been considered to have the greatest forehand the game has ever seen. Moya explained that “Roger does all what you can do with the forehand: speed, angles, anything.” Prior to their epic 2008 Wimbledon clash, Federer’s rival Rafael Nadal, who possesses one of the best forehand ever himself, described the Federer forehand as “super perfect.

Backhand: Novak Djokovic

Djokovic hits a backhand during the US Open final. Photo: Chris Trotman/Getty Images
Djokovic hits a backhand during the US Open final. Photo: Chris Trotman/Getty Images

Again, this comes as little surprise. It’s been a long time since a player dominated the game with a backhand the way Novak Djokovic does. According to Moya, “He [Djokovic] does all what you can do with the backhand as well. With the backhand, Nole can play fast and hit a winner from any position on the court. You never know what's better; down the line, cross backhand.”

Return: Novak Djokovic

Djokovic hits a return during his US Open final defeat earlier this month. Photo: Elsa/Getty Images
Djokovic hits a return during his US Open final defeat earlier this month. Photo: Elsa/Getty Images

This might be the most hotly contested area in this day and age. While servers are getting stronger, so are returners. Three members of the big four, Djokovic, Nadal, and Andy Murray would rank among the greatest returners of all time. For Moya, it was a tough decision, but perhaps not between who you might expect. “Probably Murray is very closer to [Djokovic], but Novak puts more pressure to his opponent, you serve and have the ball on your feet. It's not easy to get though. Murray is just behind him.”

Serve: Milos Raonic

Raonic hits a serve in Cincinnati last month. Photo: Joe Robbins/Getty Images
Raonic hits a serve in Cincinnati last month. Photo: Joe Robbins/Getty Images

There may be an element of bias here, but Moya did not hesitate in naming the man he coaches, Milos Raonic, as the best server in the world. When asked, the Spaniard said, “Absolutely Milos, there is not much to say.” Moya went with the Canadian over perennial choices Ivo Karlovic and John Isner. Not only is Raonic currently higher ranked on the tour than those two, but the argument could be made that his serve is stronger than those two giants not because it’s more powerful, but just the opposite. Raonic is known for his variation, spin, and accuracy on his serve, where Karlovic and Isner are known a bit more for raw power.

Mental Strength: Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic

Djokovic (right) and Nadal shake hands after their nearly six hours Australian Open final in 2012. Photo: AFP
Djokovic (right) and Nadal shake hands after their nearly six hours Australian Open final in 2012. Photo: AFP

Unable to choose between two legends, Moya simply explained that “they are the strongest in this area.” Historically, Nadal has been known as the most intense and mentally strong player on the tour, perhaps in the history of the sport. While he has struggled over the last couple of years, Djokovic has followed suit, upping his mental game which has helped make him nearly unbeatable.