Liverpool have no problem scoring goals against good defending teams, declares Jürgen Klopp

Jürgen Klopp doesn't feel that his Liverpool side are weak at breaking down defensive-minded teams ahead of their Premier League encounter with Hull City at Anfield this Saturday, insisting that they can create chances and score goals against any team.

Liverpool have no problem scoring goals against good defending teams, declares Jürgen Klopp
(Picture: Getty Images)

Jürgen Klopp doesn't believe Liverpool have any particular problems in penetrating packed Premier League defences as they prepare to face Hull City at Anfield on Saturday evening.

Mike Phelan's side are expected to try to frustrate the Reds on their trip to L4 this weekend, in the same way that Burnley did in Liverpool's only defeat so far this season at Turf Moor a month ago. 

That loss is the only blip on their start to the campaign, in which they have taken 10 from a possible 12 points against Arsenal, Tottenham Hotspur, Leicester City and Chelsea - three of which have been away from home.

But Klopp's men face the task of picking apart the Tigers on home soil this weekend if they are to maintain their strong start and record a fourth successive victory in all competitions.

Reds can create chances against anyone, says Klopp

Questioned about his side's performances against the so-called lesser sides, Klopp told reporters that their supposed shortcomings against such clubs is "something like a rumour" as he said that they "need to be angry against Hull."

He insisted that his team are "able to create chances against each team" and said that they "did it" even in their defeat to Burnley, in which they had 80 per-cent possession and 26 attempts on goal.

Klopp suggested that because they "didn't score" then they "have to think why" and "many people" have assumed that they have "big problems" against what he said journalists call "bus-parking teams."

But the Reds boss declared: "I saw not a lot of space against Chelsea. I cannot remember a lot of space against Tottenham. They were with 10 men behind the ball when we had the ball."

He explained that the entire team are "all involved in defending" which is "how it is" but admitted that they "have to find solutions" when teams set up with men behind the ball.

But he is confident that they are making progress, insisting that they haven't "just scored goals from counter-attacks" against "good defending teams" and have "scored goals" from open play and other situations.

Reds boss: Our patience and concentration will be key

Klopp also spoke about the difference in attitude and mentality he believes takes effect in these kind of games, pointing towards the different ways in which the crowd react to a missed chance against certain teams.

The manager suggested that the negative reaction to a wasted opportunity against a team like Hull can be detrimental, as opposed to the contrasting reception against someone like Chelsea.

He suggested that the "coaches, manager and crowd" can all "improve" because the game is "all about expectations."

Explaining his point, he told reporters that a missed chance against Chelsea is still met positively because "you showed the way to create a chance" but added it is "negative for everybody" if you miss a chance against Burnley.

"It feels like it should have been a goal, or whatever," Klopp continued, insisting that they "have to learn to take the games as they are" rather than "rate the opponent."

He warned that "no football game is easy" and challenged the club's supporters to create "the most special atmosphere at 3pm on Saturday afternoon at Anfield" against Hull.

Klopp suggested that missing any chance in any game is still "positive" because "it means you have created a moment where you could score" which he called "the most difficult thing in football."

He said that you "can hear" inside the stadium the excitement when a chance is missed "in a big game", adding: "But if you miss a chance in another game it's like 'oh my god.' You miss a chance in a big game, it's like 'woah' then clapping and 'go again, go again.' Miss a chance in another game and it's 'come on, not the same sh*t again'."

Laying the gauntlet down to his side, he said that they must "set the tone for the afternoon" from the game's early stages and that both the players and the crowd have to be "in the most positive mood we have ever been in" and "all have our role to play."

He said that, therefore, Liverpool must go in to the occasion "with the right expectation" and fans must "not be disappointed if we miss a chance after 10 minutes" because games are "not easier against Hull." 

"Why should it be easier?" said Klopp, who insisted that because Liverpool can "win against teams which people think are stronger than we are" then why can't other teams that "people think are weaker" than them have "the opportunity to win."

The manager believes this is something his team "have to learn" and guaranteed that it isn't a question of "the attitude of the players" as he said they must "stay concentrated and patient, but greedy and direct" and "stay completely in the game" to "have the chances."

Klopp calls upon side not to care about the name of the opponent

The Reds boss further detailed the need for his players to treat Hull as they would any of the opponents they have faced this season, taking into account the areas of Hull's game that they can look to target rather than the name, or quality, of their opponent.

Highlighting the "good moment" which his side are in, Klopp insisted they must not "make it less good" by thinking about Hull because they "should not care about the nature of the opponent."

Instead, he urged his players to focus on "the style of play" and "what we have to do" as well as "where are our opportunities" and "where is the space we can create" like they "didn't care about it [the name]" before they "played Chelsea, Tottenham, Arsenal."

Also insisting they must not think about the players they will face, he declared his team will have "100 per cent aware of the difficulties" they will face against Hull, insisting it is "very important to learn to take it as it is."