The novelty of winning the Tour de France hasn’t worn off yet, insists Chris Froome

Chris Froome rode a superb Tour de France to win it for a third time, as the processional stage into Paris will cement his legacy as one of the greatest British cyclists.

The novelty of winning the Tour de France hasn’t worn off yet, insists Chris Froome
Froome and Team Sky have been dominate throughout / Talksport

Chris Froome (Team Sky) will win the Tour de France for a third time this afternoon barring any crashes after what has been a superb three weeks for him and Sky.

The British team have practically dominated proceedings and made sure Froome will join a select group of riders including Greg LeMond in winning Le Tour for a third time after what has been a gruelling three weeks.

At the start of the Tour Nairo Quintana (Movistar) was tipped to be his closest rival, but it didn’t turn out like that as the Colombian faded multiple times and ultimately has to settle for third place.

It was an eventful Tour for Froome, on stage 12 after a motorbike crash involving the dense crowds on Mont Ventoux the Maillot Jaune holder was seen running up the mountain as his bike frame was snapped; then two days ago he crashed on a slippery descent which could have put him in trouble, but such the strength of Team Sky it didn’t make too much damage to the overall lead.

Froome admits it an ‘honour’ to have the Yellow Jersey

Throughout all of his Tour victories, Froome has showed his class; he really is living up to the mantle of being the standard bearer of the sport and speaking to the press after stage 20, Froome said: “I’ve won it three times, and I can’t say the novelty has worn off.

Froome dominated his rivals this year and in the process has taken a third Tour win / Sky Sports
Froome dominated his rivals this year and in the process has taken a third Tour win / Sky Sports

The 31-year-old is only two wins off joining the likes of Eddy Merckx and Bernard Hinault with five Tour wins, and being relatively young he could certainly cement his legacy as the best British cyclists of all time if he achieves that feat.

It’s such a big dream to have the yellow jersey. It’s an honour, the biggest in our sport. I hope to be back next year to fight again,” said Froome.

Sky and Froome certainly just didn’t wait for the big mountains to take time against his rivals; he done it across various disciplines; he descending skills on the Col de Peyresourde on stage 8 was sublime, and taking time as well as winning the stage was a bonus.

Then he gain more time when he followed a late Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo) attack on a flat stage, and then finally when it came to the mountains he did what he does best by riding away from his rivals with aplomb.

And speaking about his Tour efforts, Froome said: “There have been amazing moments where we took it on, the descents, the cross-winds and sprinting with Peter Sagan.

Things like that. You can’t script those moments. Its bike racing at its best. It feels incredible to be a part of that and to shape this year’s Tour de France in that way.”

All that is left for Froome and company is to steer clear of any unfortunate crashes, and when it comes to the Champs-Elysees this afternoon, Sky will ride home with a fourth Tour winner in five years.