Wimbledon 2016: Five unseeded players who could be a threat in the men's draw

The Wimbledon draw is made tomorrow before the tournament gets underway on Monday.

Wimbledon 2016: Five unseeded players who could be a threat in the men's draw
(Picture from Zimbo.com)

On the eve of the Wimbledon 2016 draw, a host of top names lie dangerously in the non-seeded abyss.  These five men won't be seeded at this year's Championships so could pose a major threat to the top seeds in the opening round. With a good draw they may even be able to go deep into the second week of the tournament. 

Juan Martin Del Potro

(Picture from Tennisnow.com)
(Picture from Tennisnow.com)

The 27-year-old Argentine is a popular figure on the ATP tour and many people will be glad to see him back after a career which has been blighted by injuries.

Del Potro broke the stranglehold hold of Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic at Grand Slams when he won the US Open back in 2009. However, not long after, Del Potro needed to have a surgery on his right wrist which kept him out of the game for over a year.

When he finally returned his powerful and explosive game fired him back into the world’s top five, and he is best remembered in Britain for the two epic semi-finals he played at the 2012 Olympics and at Wimbledon a year later - against Federer and Djokovic respectively.

Yet the 6 ft 6" Argentine hasn’t played consistently since 2014 after undergoing another surgery on his other wrist. At last he is back and the top seeds will want to avoid him in the opening rounds.

Kyle Edmund

(Picture from Eurosport)
(Picture from Eurosport)

Edmund has given British tennis hope that there is a future after Andy Murray. It’s still too early to say if the 21-year-old from Beverly can challenge for Grand Slams, however his progression over the past 12 months has been impressive and he is now at a career high of 68 in the world.

The Brit came close to beating David Goffin in the Davis Cup final last year before eventually going down in five sets. More recently Edmund beat world number 20 Gilles Simon on a run to quarter-finals at the Aegon Championships, where he was eventually beaten by Murray.

Edmund hasn’t won a match at Wimbledon in his three previous tournaments at SW19; however he has a strong serve and a potent forehand which work well on grass. With the home fans behind him Edmund will be a tough opponent for anyone.

Dustin Brown

(Picture from ATP)
(Picture from ATP)

Brown is probably the most entertaining player on the ATP tour. He was born in Jamaica but has represented Germany since 2010 and saves his best tennis for grass court season, most notably Wimbledon.

Nicknamed 'Dreddy’, Brown is most recognisable by his long and iconic dreadlocks, which many people saw for the first time when he stunned Nadal on Centre Court last year.

Brown’s all action game, which sees him serve-volley on most points and attempt a number of audacious trick shots, also saw him beat former champion Lleyton Hewitt at the All England Club three years ago.

He is unpredictable, flamboyant and loves the big stage, so if he’s given an opportunity don’t be surprised if he causes another major upset.

Grigor Dimitrov

(Picture from Eurosport)
(Picture from Eurosport)

Two years ago Dimitrov looked like a future Wimbledon champion. A maiden title at Queens Club was followed by a run to the semi-finals at SW19, after he knocked-out defending champion Andy Murray in straight sets.

Since then it’s been a downward spiral for the Bulgarian, who has dropped out of the world’s to 30 and has struggled for wins in 2016.

Last year Dimitrov split with his coach Roger Rasheed, who oversaw his climb up the rankings in the first place and some may suggest it was a rash decision.

Even so Dimitrov has shown in the past that if his game comes together and he finds some much needed confidence that he can be a real threat on this surface.

Borna Coric

(Picture from ATP)
(Picture from ATP)

Still only 19, Coric has now established himself as a top 50 player and many ex-professionals have compared the Croat to a young Novak Djokovic.

For some players that expectation could all be too much, however Coric often comes across as level-headed and a looks like a player who is determined to make the most of his ability.

Grass may not be his strongest surface but Coric, who reached the second round at Wimbledon last year, moves well from the back of the court and is constantly making improvements to his game.