Murray says he expects the unexpected from Raonic in Wimbledon final

Milos Raonic's lack of grand slam final experience makes him a tricky opponents, says the world No.2.

Murray says he expects the unexpected from Raonic in Wimbledon final
Can Murray claim his third grand slam crown on Sunday? (Image source: The Guardian)

Andy Murray will be chasing his second Wimbledon crown -- and third major in total -- on Sunday afternoon but concedes that his opponent, Milos Raonic, will be tricky to read given the Canadian's lack of major final experience.

The 25-year-old exorcised personal demons when dismissing Roger Federer in five-sets on Centre Court on Friday, registering his place in a grand slam final for the first time ever after near-misses at the Australian Open in January and at SW19 two years previously.

Murray, in the meantime, has breezed into his third major final of the calendar year in commanding fashion, dropping two sets all tournament and defeating Czech star Tomas Berdych in straight sets in the semi-final in just under two hours.

A new experience

"Obviously it's the first time I'll play a slam final against someone that isn't Roger or Novak. So that's different," he told reporters after booking his place in his third final at the All-England Club

The World No.2 says he's unaware of "how anyone will deal with the pressures of a slam final" and will "concentrate on his side" and prepare as normal.

Murray dispatched the Canadian in Melbourne back in January but was fortunate given Raonic's constant battle with injury after he took a two sets-to-one lead.

Such was the margin of Murray's victory on Friday he could afford a smile. (Image source: The Guardian)
Such was the margin of Murray's victory on Friday he could afford a smile. (Image source: The Guardian)

Wimbledon prestige

Murray broke a 77-year hoodoo when he triumphed over Novak Djokovic at this stage in 2013 and says a second crown would hold special importance given how much he dreamt of winning Wimbledon as a child.

"Wimbledon, for a lot of the players but especially British players growing up, this is the biggest competition," he noted.

The Scot surpassed Fred Perry's record of 11 grand slam finals and has endured enough heartbreaks to know that, as British No.1, Wimbledon always "feels a little bit more special."